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Sales City Triad | High Point, NC | 336-884-1348
 

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Josh Seibert

Let’s be honest. Training and development initiatives meant to help sales teams succeed often go wrong.

Ask salespeople to list their least favorite selling activities, and you can count on “prospecting” being at the top of the list. And, the least favorite of all prospecting activities is unquestionably making cold calls.

One of the biggest mistakes made by hardworking salespeople is the failure to prepare effectively for a sales call – not by packing a sample case, but by recognizing the true goal of their efforts.

Asking your prospect all the correct questions is wasted if you don’t hear what he or she says, either in words or more subtly in tones or partial hints. Being a good listener requires more than just keeping quiet while the other person is talking.

Becoming a good professional salesperson requires the same type of training that is required of other good professionals. Athletes, physicians, college professors, fire fighters – you name the profession, and the people at the top pay a price every day to stay there. The price they pay is their conditioning.

When asked, “How’s business?” most salespeople respond with “Great!” “Terrific!” “OK, I guess,” “Not so good,” or “Good, all things considered.” Most of these replies translate to, “I don’t know.”

Using third party letters in your sales cycle can be very effective. Often, prospects who are deciding to become clients are faced with many decisions.

There is an invisible barrier that is holding you back. It is the reason why many of us aren’t achieving the goals we set for ourselves.

How often have you listened as someone rationalized his or her mishandling of a problem by externalizing its source: “I can’t meet my projections because . . .,” “My territory isn’t large enough,” or “Our prices are too high”?

Have you stopped to think just how much the word “IF” is worth? Judging by the way so many salespeople talk, it must be worth hundreds of thousands of dollars.